Some Thoughts on Canada
Forbes: The National Defense Authorization Act is the Greatest Threat to Civil Liberties Americans Face
even if Obama chooses to veto it, there are enough congressional votes to override him
CTV: Harper, Obama expected to sign perimeter security deal
Obama and Harper are set to announce their border security arrangement tomorrow, “The perimeter arrangement is an attempt to protect the continent from terrorist threats while speeding the flow of people and products across the border.”
National Post: Leaked U.S. cable lays out North American ‘integration’ strategy
one more step as we tiptoe down the incremental road to integration
The Guardian: WikiLeaks: US targets EU over GM crops
integration with a country whose diplomatic forces see fit to actively punish the EU for exercising sovereignty in the management of their food systems and “to have pushed GM crops as a strategic government and commercial imperative”
National Post: Conservatives’ omnibus crime bill clears Commons
meanwhile the wasteful, (sadist-)fantasy-based omnibus crime bill has just passed in the House, replete with mandatory minimum sentencing
CBC: Raitt suggests economy should be ‘essential service’
this from a government wanting “to look at changing the labour code to include the economy as an essential service”
CBC: 20 ‘rights violations’ require public inquiry: report
and in a country where, as a response to Toronto’s G20 protests, “Hundreds of police officers removed their badges and many told protesters that martial law had been declared and that protesters had no longer any rights and they could be held as long as necessary.”
so how long until we have U.S. armed forces stationed within our borders, arguments based in reality falling on deaf ears, systemic opposition effectively outlawed and rebranded as “economic terrorism” (strikes) or “unlawful disturbances of the peace” (occupy, protests), and example-making punishments ranging from mandatory sentences to indefinite military detention?
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Some Thoughts on Canada

Forbes: The National Defense Authorization Act is the Greatest Threat to Civil Liberties Americans Face

even if Obama chooses to veto it, there are enough congressional votes to override him

CTV: Harper, Obama expected to sign perimeter security deal

Obama and Harper are set to announce their border security arrangement tomorrow, “The perimeter arrangement is an attempt to protect the continent from terrorist threats while speeding the flow of people and products across the border.”

National Post: Leaked U.S. cable lays out North American ‘integration’ strategy

one more step as we tiptoe down the incremental road to integration

The Guardian: WikiLeaks: US targets EU over GM crops

integration with a country whose diplomatic forces see fit to actively punish the EU for exercising sovereignty in the management of their food systems and “to have pushed GM crops as a strategic government and commercial imperative”

National Post: Conservatives’ omnibus crime bill clears Commons

meanwhile the wasteful, (sadist-)fantasy-based omnibus crime bill has just passed in the House, replete with mandatory minimum sentencing

CBC: Raitt suggests economy should be ‘essential service’

this from a government wanting “to look at changing the labour code to include the economy as an essential service”

CBC: 20 ‘rights violations’ require public inquiry: report

and in a country where, as a response to Toronto’s G20 protests, “Hundreds of police officers removed their badges and many told protesters that martial law had been declared and that protesters had no longer any rights and they could be held as long as necessary.”

so how long until we have U.S. armed forces stationed within our borders, arguments based in reality falling on deaf ears, systemic opposition effectively outlawed and rebranded as “economic terrorism” (strikes) or “unlawful disturbances of the peace” (occupy, protests), and example-making punishments ranging from mandatory sentences to indefinite military detention?

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Hungary Destroys All Monsanto GMO Corn Fields

Hungary has taken a bold stand against biotech giant Monsanto and genetic modification by destroying 1000 acres of maize found to have been grown with genetically modified seeds, according to Hungary deputy state secretary of the Minstry of Rural Development Lajos Bognar. Unlike many European Union countries, Hungary is a nation where genetically modified (GM) seeds are banned. In a similar stance against GM ingredients, Peru has also passed a 10 year ban on GM foods.

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Hungary Destroys All Monsanto GMO Corn Fields

Hungary has taken a bold stand against biotech giant Monsanto and genetic modification by destroying 1000 acres of maize found to have been grown with genetically modified seeds, according to Hungary deputy state secretary of the Minstry of Rural Development Lajos Bognar. Unlike many European Union countries, Hungary is a nation where genetically modified (GM) seeds are banned. In a similar stance against GM ingredients, Peru has also passed a 10 year ban on GM foods.

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CBC News - Harper says no decriminalization of pot on his watch

Prime Minister Stephen Harper says his government will never agree to the decriminalization of marijuana.
Harper’s comments came Friday in Vancouver in response to a question at a brief news conference following an event at a downtown science centre.
"No, it will not happen under our government," Harper said. “We’re very concerned about the spread of drugs in the country and the damage it’s doing and as you know we have legislation before the House [of Commons] to crack down."
This week, four former Vancouver mayors endorsed the Stop the Violence Coalition, which is comprised of former police officers, a judge, medical leaders and B.C.’s former chief coroner.
The coalition’s founding principle is that regulation and taxation of marijuana would stop most of the violence associated with the drug trade and make pot less accessible to children.
Current Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson has said he agrees with the coalition’s goals.
"We see the impact on the streets. We see the gang activity that’s largely funded by the marijuana trade, a huge industry here in B.C.," Robertson said. "There’s no tax revenue flowing from [it], so I think it’s time for reform."

thank you Gregor, fuck you Harper
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CBC News - Harper says no decriminalization of pot on his watch

Prime Minister Stephen Harper says his government will never agree to the decriminalization of marijuana.

Harper’s comments came Friday in Vancouver in response to a question at a brief news conference following an event at a downtown science centre.

"No, it will not happen under our government," Harper said. “We’re very concerned about the spread of drugs in the country and the damage it’s doing and as you know we have legislation before the House [of Commons] to crack down."

This week, four former Vancouver mayors endorsed the Stop the Violence Coalition, which is comprised of former police officers, a judge, medical leaders and B.C.’s former chief coroner.

The coalition’s founding principle is that regulation and taxation of marijuana would stop most of the violence associated with the drug trade and make pot less accessible to children.

Current Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson has said he agrees with the coalition’s goals.

"We see the impact on the streets. We see the gang activity that’s largely funded by the marijuana trade, a huge industry here in B.C.," Robertson said. "There’s no tax revenue flowing from [it], so I think it’s time for reform."

thank you Gregor, fuck you Harper

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The Wall Street Journal - S&P Downgrades U.S. Debt Rating - Press Release

Standard & Poor’s took the unprecedented step of downgrading the U.S. government’s “AAA” sovereign credit rating Friday in a move that could send shock waves through global. The following is a press release from Standard & Poor’s:
– We have lowered our long-term sovereign credit rating on the United States of America to ‘AA+’ from ‘AAA’ and affirmed the ‘A-1+’ short-term rating.
– We have also removed both the short- and long-term ratings from CreditWatch negative.
– The downgrade reflects our opinion that the fiscal consolidation plan that Congress and the Administration recently agreed to falls short of what, in our view, would be necessary to stabilize the government’s medium-term debt dynamics.
– More broadly, the downgrade reflects our view that the effectiveness, stability, and predictability of American policymaking and political institutions have weakened at a time of ongoing fiscal and economic challenges to a degree more than we envisioned when we assigned a negative outlook to the rating on April 18, 2011.
– Since then, we have changed our view of the difficulties in bridging the gulf between the political parties over fiscal policy, which makes us pessimistic about the capacity of Congress and the Administration to be able to leverage their agreement this week into a broader fiscal consolidation plan that stabilizes the government’s debt dynamics any time soon.
– The outlook on the long-term rating is negative. We could lower the long-term rating to ‘AA’ within the next two years if we see that less reduction in spending than agreed to, higher interest rates, or new fiscal pressures during the period result in a higher general government debt trajectory than we currently assume in our base case.

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The Wall Street Journal - S&P Downgrades U.S. Debt Rating - Press Release

Standard & Poor’s took the unprecedented step of downgrading the U.S. government’s “AAA” sovereign credit rating Friday in a move that could send shock waves through global. The following is a press release from Standard & Poor’s:

– We have lowered our long-term sovereign credit rating on the United States of America to ‘AA+’ from ‘AAA’ and affirmed the ‘A-1+’ short-term rating.

– We have also removed both the short- and long-term ratings from CreditWatch negative.

– The downgrade reflects our opinion that the fiscal consolidation plan that Congress and the Administration recently agreed to falls short of what, in our view, would be necessary to stabilize the government’s medium-term debt dynamics.

– More broadly, the downgrade reflects our view that the effectiveness, stability, and predictability of American policymaking and political institutions have weakened at a time of ongoing fiscal and economic challenges to a degree more than we envisioned when we assigned a negative outlook to the rating on April 18, 2011.

– Since then, we have changed our view of the difficulties in bridging the gulf between the political parties over fiscal policy, which makes us pessimistic about the capacity of Congress and the Administration to be able to leverage their agreement this week into a broader fiscal consolidation plan that stabilizes the government’s debt dynamics any time soon.

– The outlook on the long-term rating is negative. We could lower the long-term rating to ‘AA’ within the next two years if we see that less reduction in spending than agreed to, higher interest rates, or new fiscal pressures during the period result in a higher general government debt trajectory than we currently assume in our base case.

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NPR - Among the Costs of War: $20B in Air Conditioning

 
The amount the U.S. military spends annually on air conditioning in Iraq and Afghanistan: $20.2 billion.
That’s more than NASA’s budget. It’s more than BP has paid so far for damage during the Gulf oil spill. It’s what the G-8 has pledged to help foster new democracies in Egypt and Tunisia.

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NPR - Among the Costs of War: $20B in Air Conditioning

The amount the U.S. military spends annually on air conditioning in Iraq and Afghanistan: $20.2 billion.

That’s more than NASA’s budget. It’s more than BP has paid so far for damage during the Gulf oil spill. It’s what the G-8 has pledged to help foster new democracies in Egypt and Tunisia.

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Huffington Post - Democratic Senator Calls Big Oil Execs Selfish, Unfeeling — And Unbeatable

 
WASHINGTON — The unapologetic — indeed combative — testimony on Thursday by top oil executives summoned to defend multi-billion tax subsidies for their industry infuriated some Senate Democrats, one of whom accused the executives of being “profoundly out of touch” with average Americans.
The heads of the Big Five oil companies, currently enjoying a windfall from high oil prices, soundly rejected a Democratic request that they renounce $2 billion in tax breaks, declaring instead that they were entitled to every penny.


It was all too much for Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.).
"I get the feeling that it’s almost like you’re — like the five of you are like Saudi Arabia. That you’re caught up in your profits, you’re highly defensive, you yield on nothing," he said. "I think you’re out of touch. Deeply, profoundly out of touch. And deeply and profoundly committed to sharing nothing."
"The nature of your life, the nature of your international travel, the nature of the size of your profits — I don’t think you have any idea what the size of your profits does to the American people’s willingness to accept what you have to say," Rockefeller said.
Rockefeller, a five-term senator whose great grandfather built the giant Standard Oil monopoly, also called attention to the oil industry’s unparalleled clout on Capitol Hill.
"I think the main reason that you’re out of touch, particularly with respect to Americans, and the sacrifices that we’re having to look at here in terms of try to balance — trying to come close to balancing the budget — is that you never lose," Rockefeller said to the executives. "You’ve never lost. You always prevail. You always prevail in the halls of Congress, and you do that for a whole variety of reasons, because of your lobbyists, because of your friends, because of all the places where you do business. And I don’t really know any other business that never loses," he said.
"I’ve just never seen any industry so successful, so constantly successful. I think you all have a great sense of assurance as you are sitting there. … I don’t think you feel threatened by anything that’s going on here, and I don’t know necessarily that you have any reason to feel threatened, because of the way votes line up in this present Congress.
"I haven’t heard anybody say what they would be willing to do to share in our budget problem and in the total concept of what keeps America together, and that is essentially fairness. That everybody has to lose at some time. That everybody has to give something up for us to be a real country."

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Huffington Post - Democratic Senator Calls Big Oil Execs Selfish, Unfeeling — And Unbeatable

WASHINGTON — The unapologetic — indeed combative — testimony on Thursday by top oil executives summoned to defend multi-billion tax subsidies for their industry infuriated some Senate Democrats, one of whom accused the executives of being “profoundly out of touch” with average Americans.

The heads of the Big Five oil companies, currently enjoying a windfall from high oil prices, soundly rejected a Democratic request that they renounce $2 billion in tax breaks, declaring instead that they were entitled to every penny.

It was all too much for Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.).

"I get the feeling that it’s almost like you’re — like the five of you are like Saudi Arabia. That you’re caught up in your profits, you’re highly defensive, you yield on nothing," he said. "I think you’re out of touch. Deeply, profoundly out of touch. And deeply and profoundly committed to sharing nothing."

"The nature of your life, the nature of your international travel, the nature of the size of your profits — I don’t think you have any idea what the size of your profits does to the American people’s willingness to accept what you have to say," Rockefeller said.

Rockefeller, a five-term senator whose great grandfather built the giant Standard Oil monopoly, also called attention to the oil industry’s unparalleled clout on Capitol Hill.

"I think the main reason that you’re out of touch, particularly with respect to Americans, and the sacrifices that we’re having to look at here in terms of try to balance — trying to come close to balancing the budget — is that you never lose," Rockefeller said to the executives. "You’ve never lost. You always prevail. You always prevail in the halls of Congress, and you do that for a whole variety of reasons, because of your lobbyists, because of your friends, because of all the places where you do business. And I don’t really know any other business that never loses," he said.

"I’ve just never seen any industry so successful, so constantly successful. I think you all have a great sense of assurance as you are sitting there. … I don’t think you feel threatened by anything that’s going on here, and I don’t know necessarily that you have any reason to feel threatened, because of the way votes line up in this present Congress.

"I haven’t heard anybody say what they would be willing to do to share in our budget problem and in the total concept of what keeps America together, and that is essentially fairness. That everybody has to lose at some time. That everybody has to give something up for us to be a real country."

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The New York Times - Gay Marriage Approved by N.Y. Senate
…and in happier news!
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The New York Times - Gay Marriage Approved by N.Y. Senate

…and in happier news!

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The Globe and Mail - Harper to pick former B.C. premier as Canadian envoy to Britain
Now he’ll have a whole nother side of the road to drink and drive on (or “drink-drive" on, in the common parlance of all those newly at-risk Brits out there). And with diplomatic immunity no less!
Honestly, what does it say about the state of representative democracy when a man loathed out of his own job as premier (“single-digit popularity”, according to the same Globe article) and, by the same token, out of his own political home (British Columbia), is whisked overseas to take up a governmental sinecure? Not only do we residents of British Columbia demonstrably not want the man representing us at home, he is now going to represent our entire country abroad. Shouldn’t a public figure’s track record of indefensible personal judgment count for something?
I seem to recall the same Gordon Campbell chiming in on the case of Ray Lam, a provincial NDP candidate who was shamefully shamed out of running for the Vancouver-False Creek seat after a picture of him cheekily touching a woman’s breast with his (gay-man) hand was discovered on his Facebook (see: this CBC article). Yes there were other pictures, but yes, they were between consenting adults, and consenting adults should be pretty much allowed to do whatever they want so long as it doesn’t hurt or risk hurting anyone (i.e., a whole colourful spectrum of non-drinking-and-driving activities).
Quoth envoy-elect Campbell on the case of Ray Lam:

"This was public information. It was on the NDP website and they have some responsibilities in terms of that. … They were totally inappropriate pictures and the NDP has some questions to answer for," he said Monday while campaigning near Vancouver.

Well how about the above pictures, eh?
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The Globe and Mail - Harper to pick former B.C. premier as Canadian envoy to Britain

Now he’ll have a whole nother side of the road to drink and drive on (or “drink-drive" on, in the common parlance of all those newly at-risk Brits out there). And with diplomatic immunity no less!

Honestly, what does it say about the state of representative democracy when a man loathed out of his own job as premier (“single-digit popularity”, according to the same Globe article) and, by the same token, out of his own political home (British Columbia), is whisked overseas to take up a governmental sinecure? Not only do we residents of British Columbia demonstrably not want the man representing us at home, he is now going to represent our entire country abroad. Shouldn’t a public figure’s track record of indefensible personal judgment count for something?

I seem to recall the same Gordon Campbell chiming in on the case of Ray Lam, a provincial NDP candidate who was shamefully shamed out of running for the Vancouver-False Creek seat after a picture of him cheekily touching a woman’s breast with his (gay-man) hand was discovered on his Facebook (see: this CBC article). Yes there were other pictures, but yes, they were between consenting adults, and consenting adults should be pretty much allowed to do whatever they want so long as it doesn’t hurt or risk hurting anyone (i.e., a whole colourful spectrum of non-drinking-and-driving activities).

Quoth envoy-elect Campbell on the case of Ray Lam:

"This was public information. It was on the NDP website and they have some responsibilities in terms of that. … They were totally inappropriate pictures and the NDP has some questions to answer for," he said Monday while campaigning near Vancouver.

Well how about the above pictures, eh?

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, June 3, 2011
Senate Page disrupts throne speechHarper’s disastrous agenda needs to be stopped with creative action and civil disobedience
Ottawa — During the reading of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s throne speech today, a young page was yanked from the Senate Chamber as she tried to hold up a stop-sign placard reading “Stop Harper.”
"Harper’s agenda is disastrous for this country and for my generation," Brigette Marcelle says. "We have to stop him from wasting billions on fighter jets, military bases, and corporate tax cuts while cutting social programs and destroying the climate. Most people in this country know what we need are green jobs, better medicare, and a healthy environment for future generations."
Brigette Marcelle, 21 and a recent graduate from University of Ottawa, has been a page in the Senate for a year, but realized that working within parliament wouldn’t stop Harper’s agenda.
"Contrary to Harper’s rhetoric, Conservative values are not in fact Canadian values. How could they be when 3 out of 4 eligible voters didn’t even give their support to the Conservatives? But we will only be able to stop Harper’s agenda if people of all ages and from all walks of life engage in creative actions and civil disobediance," she says.
"This country needs a Canadian version of an Arab Spring, a flowering of popular movements that demonstrate that real power to change things lies not with Harper but in the hands of the people, when we act together in our streets, neighbourhoods and workplaces."
-30-

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Friday, June 3, 2011

Senate Page disrupts throne speech
Harper’s disastrous agenda needs to be stopped with creative action and civil disobedience

Ottawa — During the reading of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s throne speech today, a young page was yanked from the Senate Chamber as she tried to hold up a stop-sign placard reading “Stop Harper.”

"Harper’s agenda is disastrous for this country and for my generation," Brigette Marcelle says. "We have to stop him from wasting billions on fighter jets, military bases, and corporate tax cuts while cutting social programs and destroying the climate. Most people in this country know what we need are green jobs, better medicare, and a healthy environment for future generations."

Brigette Marcelle, 21 and a recent graduate from University of Ottawa, has been a page in the Senate for a year, but realized that working within parliament wouldn’t stop Harper’s agenda.

"Contrary to Harper’s rhetoric, Conservative values are not in fact Canadian values. How could they be when 3 out of 4 eligible voters didn’t even give their support to the Conservatives? But we will only be able to stop Harper’s agenda if people of all ages and from all walks of life engage in creative actions and civil disobediance," she says.

"This country needs a Canadian version of an Arab Spring, a flowering of popular movements that demonstrate that real power to change things lies not with Harper but in the hands of the people, when we act together in our streets, neighbourhoods and workplaces."

-30-

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Matt Peters - 6,201 reasons to get frustrated

Matt Peters and Ryan Boldt decided to dust off their calculators this afternoon and do some ‘rithmatic. They were appalled at what they discovered. Time for some sobering statistics. You might want to prepare a barf bag:
• 6,201. Friends, this is not the title of the newest Rush album. This is a number we need to remember over the course of the next four years and especially during the next election. 6,201 is the COMBINED margin of victory across the 14 most closely contested Conservative ridings in Canada. The COMBINED margin of victory. This is how close the election actually was. In each of these races the Conservatives had a margin of victory of less than 800 votes. Most margins were much, much smaller. See below for a statistical breakdown.
• 14. You need to remember this number for two reasons. Firstly, it is the number of seats the Conservatives currently have above and beyond their majority. In these 14 contentious races, if there had been even a slightly more focused effort by the parties on the Left to consolidate their voter bases we could have easily swayed the balance of power away from the Conservatives and prevented their majority (only 6,201 votes total were needed, spread across 14 ridings). 14 is also significant because, if you can believe it, 14 votes was the actual margin of victory for the Conservatives over the Liberals in the eastern Ontario riding of Nipissing-Timiskaming. In this riding 11,357 people voted for the NDP or the Green party. 27,887 registered electors didn’t vote at all. Only 14 votes were needed to defeat the Conservatives. Let that sink in.

Necessary options: electoral reform or, if FPTP prevails, a centre-left merger.
Bright spot: whatever happens with electoral reform or merger activity, the Greens have a legitimizing toehold from which to illustrate a clear political alternative, one that might be said to exist outside the standard left-right spectrum. They will have to communicate that they are not a “single-issue party”, but rather a party with a fundamentally different set of basic values, values that can be shown to logically and consistently inform all areas of government policy.
Encouraging: younger types seem to give a shit at last, although enduring attention spans and a willingness to take action remain to be proven.
Tiresome: party politics in general. Blindly fervid allegiance to political brands and overnight idolization of leaders strike me as curiously-palatable secular substitutes for the sort of zaniness one comes across in religion. Ideally, engaged and conscientious voters would determine their own values without the influence of arbitrary political entities, and an active and sustained public conversation (magically safeguarded from the pernicious influence of lobbyist money, caveat caveat etc. etc.) would follow. Obviously, a policy-minded zeitgeist isn’t something that’s going to just pop up overnight, but there’s always room for improvement from where we are. The only way people will get engaged, though, is: (1) on a hyper-partisan and oversimplified basis à la Democrats vs. Republicans; (2) on an individualized, collaborative, and eclectic basis, one outside the ham-fisted, dogmatic, and innately antagonistic context of old school party politics.
Not an option: cynical apathy.
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Matt Peters - 6,201 reasons to get frustrated

Matt Peters and Ryan Boldt decided to dust off their calculators this afternoon and do some ‘rithmatic. They were appalled at what they discovered. Time for some sobering statistics. You might want to prepare a barf bag:

• 6,201. Friends, this is not the title of the newest Rush album. This is a number we need to remember over the course of the next four years and especially during the next election. 6,201 is the COMBINED margin of victory across the 14 most closely contested Conservative ridings in Canada. The COMBINED margin of victory. This is how close the election actually was. In each of these races the Conservatives had a margin of victory of less than 800 votes. Most margins were much, much smaller. See below for a statistical breakdown.

• 14. You need to remember this number for two reasons. Firstly, it is the number of seats the Conservatives currently have above and beyond their majority. In these 14 contentious races, if there had been even a slightly more focused effort by the parties on the Left to consolidate their voter bases we could have easily swayed the balance of power away from the Conservatives and prevented their majority (only 6,201 votes total were needed, spread across 14 ridings). 14 is also significant because, if you can believe it, 14 votes was the actual margin of victory for the Conservatives over the Liberals in the eastern Ontario riding of Nipissing-Timiskaming. In this riding 11,357 people voted for the NDP or the Green party. 27,887 registered electors didn’t vote at all. Only 14 votes were needed to defeat the Conservatives. Let that sink in.

Necessary options: electoral reform or, if FPTP prevails, a centre-left merger.

Bright spot: whatever happens with electoral reform or merger activity, the Greens have a legitimizing toehold from which to illustrate a clear political alternative, one that might be said to exist outside the standard left-right spectrum. They will have to communicate that they are not a “single-issue party”, but rather a party with a fundamentally different set of basic values, values that can be shown to logically and consistently inform all areas of government policy.

Encouraging: younger types seem to give a shit at last, although enduring attention spans and a willingness to take action remain to be proven.

Tiresome: party politics in general. Blindly fervid allegiance to political brands and overnight idolization of leaders strike me as curiously-palatable secular substitutes for the sort of zaniness one comes across in religion. Ideally, engaged and conscientious voters would determine their own values without the influence of arbitrary political entities, and an active and sustained public conversation (magically safeguarded from the pernicious influence of lobbyist money, caveat caveat etc. etc.) would follow. Obviously, a policy-minded zeitgeist isn’t something that’s going to just pop up overnight, but there’s always room for improvement from where we are. The only way people will get engaged, though, is: (1) on a hyper-partisan and oversimplified basis à la Democrats vs. Republicans; (2) on an individualized, collaborative, and eclectic basis, one outside the ham-fisted, dogmatic, and innately antagonistic context of old school party politics.

Not an option: cynical apathy.

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well then, gonna get all my abortions and gay marriages in this week before it’s too late
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well then, gonna get all my abortions and gay marriages in this week before it’s too late

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things I enjoy about this otherwise distasteful / macabre / off-putting garment seen at the Time Square celebration of the millenium:
- misplaced use of an apostrophe to show omission
- the fact that he filled in the K, but was so pumped to get out there and start cele-hating that he just didn’t have time to do the rest
also, I quite enjoyed M.I.A.’s musing this morning:

what a disney weekend Princes Married, Bad guys killed.. the world lives happily ever after

yes, M.I.A. gets a free ride on poor grammar 
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things I enjoy about this otherwise distasteful / macabre / off-putting garment seen at the Time Square celebration of the millenium:

- misplaced use of an apostrophe to show omission

- the fact that he filled in the K, but was so pumped to get out there and start cele-hating that he just didn’t have time to do the rest

also, I quite enjoyed M.I.A.’s musing this morning:

what a disney weekend Princes Married, Bad guys killed.. the world lives happily ever after

yes, M.I.A. gets a free ride on poor grammar 

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welcome to America!
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welcome to America!

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