Larry Campbell, Philip Owen, and Sam Sullivan - Three former Vancouver mayors: We can’t afford a war on weed

Canada has reached a critical time in its misguided War on Weed. Despite investing countless billions across North America in areas such as law enforcement, prison expansion and border controls, marijuana prohibition has been a costly failure. Youth today have easier access to pot than alcohol and tobacco, organized crime is getting rich and some neighbourhoods remain deadly combat zones as arrests lead to new rounds of turf warfare among gangs controlling the marijuana trade.
Now, Canada’s federal government and the B.C. provincial government are on the verge of committing many more billions of our tax dollars to this failed policy.
It’s lunacy. 
Since 1908, when Canada passed the Anti-Opium Act, we have had a century of experience to know that an approach that emphasizes prohibition and leans heavily on costly law enforcement and imprisonment will fail.


The federal and provincial governments should heed the words of the Fraser Institute, a conservative-leaning think tank that opposes marijuana prohibition and laments the fact that marijuana-related revenue and profits go straight to criminal enterprises rather than government coffers.
Politicians at all levels — whether in government or opposition — can no longer ignore the violence, crime and financial costs to taxpayers related to marijuana prohibition. By taxing and regulating marijuana under a strict public health framework, politicians can help stop the growth of a massive underground economy that enriches gangsters rather than the public purse and does nothing to prevent young people from easily accessing marijuana. Politicians must act, now, before billions more are foolishly spent and further blood is shed.
It’s time politicians recognize that prohibition has been with us for 103 years, and ask themselves, “How are we doing so far?”

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Larry Campbell, Philip Owen, and Sam Sullivan - Three former Vancouver mayors: We can’t afford a war on weed

Canada has reached a critical time in its misguided War on Weed. Despite investing countless billions across North America in areas such as law enforcement, prison expansion and border controls, marijuana prohibition has been a costly failure. Youth today have easier access to pot than alcohol and tobacco, organized crime is getting rich and some neighbourhoods remain deadly combat zones as arrests lead to new rounds of turf warfare among gangs controlling the marijuana trade.

Now, Canada’s federal government and the B.C. provincial government are on the verge of committing many more billions of our tax dollars to this failed policy.

It’s lunacy. 

Since 1908, when Canada passed the Anti-Opium Act, we have had a century of experience to know that an approach that emphasizes prohibition and leans heavily on costly law enforcement and imprisonment will fail.

The federal and provincial governments should heed the words of the Fraser Institute, a conservative-leaning think tank that opposes marijuana prohibition and laments the fact that marijuana-related revenue and profits go straight to criminal enterprises rather than government coffers.

Politicians at all levels — whether in government or opposition — can no longer ignore the violence, crime and financial costs to taxpayers related to marijuana prohibition. By taxing and regulating marijuana under a strict public health framework, politicians can help stop the growth of a massive underground economy that enriches gangsters rather than the public purse and does nothing to prevent young people from easily accessing marijuana. Politicians must act, now, before billions more are foolishly spent and further blood is shed.

It’s time politicians recognize that prohibition has been with us for 103 years, and ask themselves, “How are we doing so far?”

G

CBC News - Harper says no decriminalization of pot on his watch

Prime Minister Stephen Harper says his government will never agree to the decriminalization of marijuana.
Harper’s comments came Friday in Vancouver in response to a question at a brief news conference following an event at a downtown science centre.
"No, it will not happen under our government," Harper said. “We’re very concerned about the spread of drugs in the country and the damage it’s doing and as you know we have legislation before the House [of Commons] to crack down."
This week, four former Vancouver mayors endorsed the Stop the Violence Coalition, which is comprised of former police officers, a judge, medical leaders and B.C.’s former chief coroner.
The coalition’s founding principle is that regulation and taxation of marijuana would stop most of the violence associated with the drug trade and make pot less accessible to children.
Current Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson has said he agrees with the coalition’s goals.
"We see the impact on the streets. We see the gang activity that’s largely funded by the marijuana trade, a huge industry here in B.C.," Robertson said. "There’s no tax revenue flowing from [it], so I think it’s time for reform."

thank you Gregor, fuck you Harper
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CBC News - Harper says no decriminalization of pot on his watch

Prime Minister Stephen Harper says his government will never agree to the decriminalization of marijuana.

Harper’s comments came Friday in Vancouver in response to a question at a brief news conference following an event at a downtown science centre.

"No, it will not happen under our government," Harper said. “We’re very concerned about the spread of drugs in the country and the damage it’s doing and as you know we have legislation before the House [of Commons] to crack down."

This week, four former Vancouver mayors endorsed the Stop the Violence Coalition, which is comprised of former police officers, a judge, medical leaders and B.C.’s former chief coroner.

The coalition’s founding principle is that regulation and taxation of marijuana would stop most of the violence associated with the drug trade and make pot less accessible to children.

Current Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson has said he agrees with the coalition’s goals.

"We see the impact on the streets. We see the gang activity that’s largely funded by the marijuana trade, a huge industry here in B.C.," Robertson said. "There’s no tax revenue flowing from [it], so I think it’s time for reform."

thank you Gregor, fuck you Harper

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Stop the Violence BC - Cannabis and Prohibition

In British Columbia, the marijuana market is estimated to be worth up to 7 billion dollars; double the total revenue of BC’s agriculture, forestry and fishing sectors combined. 

These massive illegal revenues fuel crime, violence and corruption across the province, and help fund criminal activities like importing cocaine and guns. 

While marijuana use is not free from harms, health experts have concluded that alcohol and tobacco are much more dangerous. In fact, experts believe that a regulated legal market for adult marijuana use is the best way to protect public health and improve public safety.

The strict regulation of marijuana has the potential to eliminate the violent illegal marijuana market, and to raise untold tax revenue, while at the same time ending wasteful marijuana law enforcement spending that only drains tax dollars. 

Most importantly, BC is ready for this. A recent poll concluded that 69% of British Columbians state that arresting marijuana producers and sellers is ineffective, and that BC would be better off taxing and regulating the use of marijuana. 

Marijuana prohibition has failed. It’s time to stop the violence.

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Absolutely Fabulous - S02E05 Poor

Although why anybody wants to be a student nowadays is a mystery to me. No fun, darling. No demos, no experimental drug-taking, you’re just industry fodder darling. At least in my day darling, people used to go to university just to close ‘em down. What will your protest be darling? ‘Pair of stripy tights and some liquorice all-sort earrings.’ Oh well, call out the National Guard. 

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Absolutely Fabulous - S02E05 Poor

Although why anybody wants to be a student nowadays is a mystery to me. No fun, darling. No demos, no experimental drug-taking, you’re just industry fodder darling. At least in my day darling, people used to go to university just to close ‘em down. What will your protest be darling? ‘Pair of stripy tights and some liquorice all-sort earrings.’ Oh well, call out the National Guard. 

G

Black Dynamite - Drugs Are Fun

it’s a layer of heroin, surrounded by, two layers of COCAAAAAAAAINE

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Neon Indian - Should Have Taken Acid with You

Being that it’s Easter, I’m suddenly reminded of a time when, as a single-digit kid, I was wandering around in a house set to be demolished (trotting after a parent conducting some obscure adult business, mind you, not out of any adventurous inclination on my retiring little part).

In one barren room, someone had scrawled the phrase “Jesus on ecstasy” on a weathered mustard wall. This made quite the impression on me, but, all childhood inquisitiveness aside, I never asked anyone what the phrase meant. Probably the off-kilter context coupled with a nascent, uncomfortable perception that not everything in life would be simple and cohesive, put me off from discovering too much.

In retrospect, “Jesus on ecstasy” probably wouldn’t be all that exceptional; I’m sure he was an energetic and compassionately loving enough guy as is. “Jesus on acid”, however, seems a far more compelling phenomenon.

Should have taken acid with you
Touch the stars and the planets too
Should have taken acid with you
Melt our tongues and become unglued

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The Haunting

re: post below, they just don’t make anti-drug commercials like they used to.

Meth Song

this was played throughout the early-to-late 90s (i.e throughout the better half of my childhood), on every station i watched and at the exact times they knew i would be watching (early morning before school, during afternoon snack and pretty much all day saturday and sunday).

it still haunts me to this day. 

A

I will be singing this ALL WEEKEND LONG.

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Tags: drugs

RATATAT - Drugs

Just say no.

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Tags: drugs music