The New York Times - The Proper Way to Eat a Pig
Fetishization of the butchery and consumption of emotional, intelligent sentient beings under the guise of enlightened behaviour, all implicitly condoned by the one-sided reportage of The New York Times.

A process of moving from alienation from tangible violence to a direct encounter with it, then an amorally airy glide into sociopathic participation:

“I don’t feel guilty, and I don’t feel bad. It is a pure and intense experience, but it is the most complicated experience you can have in terms of living and dying.”

The New York Times - The Proper Way to Eat a Pig

Fetishization of the butchery and consumption of emotional, intelligent sentient beings under the guise of enlightened behaviour, all implicitly condoned by the one-sided reportage of The New York Times.

A process of moving from alienation from tangible violence to a direct encounter with it, then an amorally airy glide into sociopathic participation:

“I don’t feel guilty, and I don’t feel bad. It is a pure and intense experience, but it is the most complicated experience you can have in terms of living and dying.”

MURDERED ANIMALS MEBBE?

MURDERED ANIMALS MEBBE?

ANIMALS !

ANIMALS !

Dogs in Cars

♥ ♥ 

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big fan of not being at work
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big fan of not being at work

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Peter Singer - Animal Liberation

Animal Liberation will require greater altruism on the part of human beings than any other liberation movement. The animals themselves are incapable of demanding their own liberation, or of protesting against their condition with votes, demonstrations, or boycotts. Human beings have the power to continue to oppress other species forever, or until we make this planet unsuitable for living beings. Will our tyranny continue, proving that morality counts for nothing when it clashes with self-interest, as the most cynical of poets and philosophers have always said? Or will we rise to the challenge and prove our capacity for genuine altruism by ending our ruthless exploitation of the species in our power, not because we are forced to do so by rebels or terrorists, but because we recognize that our position is morally indefensible?
The way in which we answer this question depends on the way in which each one of us, individually, answers it.

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Peter Singer - Animal Liberation

Animal Liberation will require greater altruism on the part of human beings than any other liberation movement. The animals themselves are incapable of demanding their own liberation, or of protesting against their condition with votes, demonstrations, or boycotts. Human beings have the power to continue to oppress other species forever, or until we make this planet unsuitable for living beings. Will our tyranny continue, proving that morality counts for nothing when it clashes with self-interest, as the most cynical of poets and philosophers have always said? Or will we rise to the challenge and prove our capacity for genuine altruism by ending our ruthless exploitation of the species in our power, not because we are forced to do so by rebels or terrorists, but because we recognize that our position is morally indefensible?

The way in which we answer this question depends on the way in which each one of us, individually, answers it.

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Artinfo - Photographer Charlotte Dumas Tells the Story Behind Her Portraits of 9/11 Rescue Dogs

Over the past decade Dutch photographer Charlotte Dumas has fashioned a promising art career around soulful, haunting portraits of wolves, Roman Army and NYPD horses, the stray dogs of Palermo and New York, and even a blind circus tiger in an attempt to show that “the state of mankind can be read and studied by the way we relate to animals.” She’s succeeded critically and commercially: Sofia Coppola and the late Alexander McQueen are among many luminaries who’ve collected her emotive work.

For her latest project, the 34-year-old artist tracked down the last remaining rescue dogs who worked during in the 9/11 recovery effort. “I started my career portraying police dogs in my studio,” Dumas says, noting she initially thought to shoot retired military canines. “When I focused on search dogs it got me curious about which ones would still be alive from 9/11. In my memory, it was the photographs of the dogs in the papers that stayed with me most.”

With the help of FEMA, Dumas tracked down 15 survivors — down from 90 who originally served the sites — in nine states, from Ojai, California to Ipswich, Massachusetts, where she shot her first portrait of the black Labrador retriever, Tara. “She’s the oldest in the series and passed away shortly after I shot her,” Dumas laments. “It was a tough shoot because she couldn’t really stand anymore and I wanted to portray her in a moment of awareness.”

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The Midnight Show - School of French Kissing for Dogs

I almost died, from the loling

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the newly rediscovered rainbow toad
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the newly rediscovered rainbow toad

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