"You bring someone great pleasure this week. Probably sexual. Probably you use your mouth. Really go for it."

Miranda July - The Future

"Something will become engorged when you least expect it. How you deal with this will have repercussions for the next 4 years."

Miranda July - The Future

Miranda July - The Future

The Future seems to have a somewhat pessimistic view of life. Is that a fair assessment?
July: I don’t think it’s pessimistic. I mean, there’s one part of the movie I can think of that’s a little doomful, but I don’t think the movie as a whole is. It’s sad, but I feel like it’s the kind of sad that has openness to it. It’s not like everything’s awful and a drag. I certainly don’t feel that everything’s awful. I’m a pretty optimistic person. That said, I take things pretty seriously. Everything always feels very high stakes to me and kind of dramatic so it’s easy in a movie like this that shows so much inner world, for it to reflect that.

[source]
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Miranda July - The Future

The Future seems to have a somewhat pessimistic view of life. Is that a fair assessment?

July: I don’t think it’s pessimistic. I mean, there’s one part of the movie I can think of that’s a little doomful, but I don’t think the movie as a whole is. It’s sad, but I feel like it’s the kind of sad that has openness to it. It’s not like everything’s awful and a drag. I certainly don’t feel that everything’s awful. I’m a pretty optimistic person. That said, I take things pretty seriously. Everything always feels very high stakes to me and kind of dramatic so it’s easy in a movie like this that shows so much inner world, for it to reflect that.

[source]

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"

The Future: Today you will try something for the second time. This time it will work out. Don’t bother being relieved, just move on.

good luck,
Miranda

"

Miranda July - Your Future

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The New York Times - Miranda July Is Totally Not Kidding

The urban bohemian irks precisely because his or her quirky individuality is just part of a different kind of uniformity, where the uniform happens to be a bushy beard or Zooey Deschanel bangs rather than country-club khakis. Twee fascinations with childhood innocence can mask an unwillingness to tackle life’s darker quandaries. Who wouldn’t be annoyed by a guy who, say, finds a cracked milk bottle, makes a film about it, then silk screens it on a T-shirt and names his band Milk Bottle? The stakes are low. The results are soon forgotten.
But is Miranda July the archenemy of seriousness? She has an affinity for surface detail, like the childlike scrawl on her sculptures that appeared in the Venice Biennale or the matching haircuts of her two main characters in “The Future.” But unlike certain directors who fixate on marginalia, creating art in which the engraving on a character’s belt buckle takes precedence over the story, July’s seemingly superficial gestures service something greater: a pulsing emotional center. It’s odd that she has come to represent, for some, a kind of soulless hipster cool, because in July’s work, nobody is cool. There’s no irony to it, no insider wink. Her characters are ordinary people whose lives don’t normally invite investigation. So her project is the opposite of hipster exclusion: her work is desperate to bring people together, forcing them into a kind of fellow feeling. She’s unrelentingly sincere, and maybe that sincerity makes her difficult to bear. It also might make her culturally essential


July set out to write a tighter, more controlled story than her first film, with fewer characters. She was also in her 30s, and she was feeling older and less rainbow colored.
“It’s kind of about letting go of that feeling of my 20s, that feeling that I will do absolutely everything, I will have sex with everyone, I will go to every country,” she says. “In your 30s, it’s obvious that a finite amount of things will happen.” In “The Future,” the characters sum it up. Sophie: “We’ll be 40 in five years.” Jason: “Forty is basically 50. And then after 50, the rest is just loose change.”


The day after “The Future” was completed last fall, Putterlik died at age 81. In the spring, his wife died, too. July found out that most of their things were being tossed in a Dumpster, and so, in a panic, she drove over to their house and rescued as many objects as she could.
The tableau — July rifling through a box of poignant mementos, including a plastic-cow diorama that she placed gently on its side — could well have been a scene in one of her films. It could even, at first glance, have seemed like the kind of moment her critics accuse her of: a boxful of curiosities passed off as profundity.
But when she showed me the construction-paper card, holding it very carefully, she was clearly touched by this man’s love for his wife. With her film, she’s trying to understand and excavate something of that love. There was no fetishizing of the oddball, no crippling nostalgia, no lack of gravitas, either in that desire or in its result.
Maybe not everyone will believe this about her. I asked her what, if anything, she would like to say to those people. “I would just say I’m totally not kidding,” she said. “Life is too short. This is all too hard to do to actually be kidding about the whole thing.”

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The New York Times - Miranda July Is Totally Not Kidding

The urban bohemian irks precisely because his or her quirky individuality is just part of a different kind of uniformity, where the uniform happens to be a bushy beard or Zooey Deschanel bangs rather than country-club khakis. Twee fascinations with childhood innocence can mask an unwillingness to tackle life’s darker quandaries. Who wouldn’t be annoyed by a guy who, say, finds a cracked milk bottle, makes a film about it, then silk screens it on a T-shirt and names his band Milk Bottle? The stakes are low. The results are soon forgotten.

But is Miranda July the archenemy of seriousness? She has an affinity for surface detail, like the childlike scrawl on her sculptures that appeared in the Venice Biennale or the matching haircuts of her two main characters in “The Future.” But unlike certain directors who fixate on marginalia, creating art in which the engraving on a character’s belt buckle takes precedence over the story, July’s seemingly superficial gestures service something greater: a pulsing emotional center. It’s odd that she has come to represent, for some, a kind of soulless hipster cool, because in July’s work, nobody is cool. There’s no irony to it, no insider wink. Her characters are ordinary people whose lives don’t normally invite investigation. So her project is the opposite of hipster exclusion: her work is desperate to bring people together, forcing them into a kind of fellow feeling. She’s unrelentingly sincere, and maybe that sincerity makes her difficult to bear. It also might make her culturally essential

July set out to write a tighter, more controlled story than her first film, with fewer characters. She was also in her 30s, and she was feeling older and less rainbow colored.

“It’s kind of about letting go of that feeling of my 20s, that feeling that I will do absolutely everything, I will have sex with everyone, I will go to every country,” she says. “In your 30s, it’s obvious that a finite amount of things will happen.” In “The Future,” the characters sum it up. Sophie: “We’ll be 40 in five years.” Jason: “Forty is basically 50. And then after 50, the rest is just loose change.”

The day after “The Future” was completed last fall, Putterlik died at age 81. In the spring, his wife died, too. July found out that most of their things were being tossed in a Dumpster, and so, in a panic, she drove over to their house and rescued as many objects as she could.

The tableau — July rifling through a box of poignant mementos, including a plastic-cow diorama that she placed gently on its side — could well have been a scene in one of her films. It could even, at first glance, have seemed like the kind of moment her critics accuse her of: a boxful of curiosities passed off as profundity.

But when she showed me the construction-paper card, holding it very carefully, she was clearly touched by this man’s love for his wife. With her film, she’s trying to understand and excavate something of that love. There was no fetishizing of the oddball, no crippling nostalgia, no lack of gravitas, either in that desire or in its result.

Maybe not everyone will believe this about her. I asked her what, if anything, she would like to say to those people. “I would just say I’m totally not kidding,” she said. “Life is too short. This is all too hard to do to actually be kidding about the whole thing.”

G

"i want a boyfriend. someone with good taste in music and good style in clothes. nice hair and beautiful voice. mail me if you exist within one hour radius. help me make my summer."

ffffound on a personal style blog as part of a larger ‘outfit post’

which can only mean one thing (and what i’ve secretly suspected all along):

personal style blogs are nothing more than glorified eharmony/plenty of fish/dudesnude/manhunt/grindr profile pages.

just a theory, but sounds about right.

A